How to Find the Best Pair of Headphones for Exercise

workout headphonesWhether you’re a runner, a biker or a gym rat, music can provide excellent motivation for exercise. Studies have shown that people who listen to music while they sweat can last 15 percent longer than those who don’t.

The problem often is finding a pair of headphones that can keep up with you. The ones you use for exercise must be durable and they can’t slip out of your ears easily or you’ll be getting too worked up over your workout. Read on for tips on choosing the best pair of headphones for exercise.

Ear Buds or Headphones?

Ear buds are a popular way to listen to iPods and other MP3s, of course. But the biggest problem with them is they don’t stay in your ears when you start to sweat. It’s incredibly frustrating to have to keep putting the ear bud back into the ear time after time on the treadmill.

That’s why many people are switching to lightweight headphones while they’re on the run (or on the bike or on the elliptical). They stay in your ears much more securely, and the band over your head is barely noticeable if you get something light enough.

Battle of the Sexes

You may not know this, but women actually have smaller ear canals than men, and many unisex headphones are way too big for them. If you’re a woman, you’d be wise to invest in headphones that are made specifically for women. They’ll stay in your ears better, and you’ll be better able to hear the sound through the correctly sized buds.

Tailor Them to Your Activity

If you’re a runner, you may not want big, bulky headphones even though they deliver better sound. But for an exerciser who will also be using the headphones during their downtime restoring 1968 Mustang parts or building ships in glass bottles, bigger headphones may be a better buy for multi-tasking.

There are also now some terrific innovations on the market for exercise-oriented headphones, including ones that are wireless. You carry your music device on you as usual, but there’s no cord between the device and the earphones. Instead, a Bluetooth or other device links them wirelessly, allowing for more ease of movement.

This is ideal for a sport like running, where the cords are constantly flapping into the way of the athlete, or stair climbing, where there’s lots of movement and it’s easy to accidentally snag the earphone cord and send the MP3 flying across the gym.

Cost

The one drawback to the wireless headphones is that they often cost more than traditional ones. In fact, any headphones specifically tailored to exercise are going to be a bigger investment, simply because specialization nearly always means greater cost.

You can shop around for the best deal on the headphones; some sites and brick-and-mortar store locations will even let you try out a pair for a day before you decide whether you want to make the full investment.

Author Bio: Alicia Lawrence is a content coordinator for WebpageFX and blogs about online PR in her free time.

Image source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/myheimu/7996239327/

About Bobbe Sommer

http://www.awesomeheadphones.com/

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